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Kefir Using Live Kefir Grains

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Kefir (Using Live Kefir Grains)
Kefir grains last forever if you take care of them and they can last for generations. Kefir grains are not really grains but rather combinations of good bacteria and yeasts that infuse your milk or non dairy milk with over 50+ good bacteria and good yeasts. They look like little pieces of cauliflower and feel a little rubbery. They’re tough little guys and you can pull them apart, and they just grow more. Kefir grains are a little like having a pet. You have to feed and take care of them but that’s easy to do and I can show you how. If you need more help, check out our Faq's about kefir page. ~Donna
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Ingredients
Servings: Cups
Units:
Instructions
Making Kefir
  1. Place 1 tablespoon of fresh kefir grains in a glass jar and fill the jar with (2- 3 cups) fresh milk. Add less milk if your home is on the cooler side (68 degrees or below) add more milk if your home is above 75 degrees.
    Place 1 tablespoon of fresh kefir grains in a glass jar and fill the jar with (2- 3 cups) fresh milk. Add less milk if your home is on the cooler side (68 degrees or below) add more milk if your home is above 75 degrees.
  2. Place a lid on the jar and let sit at room temperature for approximately 24 hours (or until the milk has thickened or has become sour tasting). You might see tiny pockets of whey forming, this means it's done.
    Place a lid on the jar and let sit at room temperature for approximately 24 hours (or until the milk has thickened or has become sour tasting). You might see tiny pockets of whey forming, this means it's done.
  3. Pour the contents into a strainer and strain the kefir into a container to separate the grains from the liquid kefir.
    Pour the contents into a strainer and strain the kefir into a container to separate the grains from the liquid kefir.
  4. Add fresh milk to the remaining kefir grains, then the whole process is simply repeated for the next batch. Your kefir grains will grow and multiply each week, so increase the milk or remove some of the grains. You can give your extra grains to friends or pets, or you can even blend them up in the blender with a smoothie and drink them. They are good for you!
    Add fresh milk to the remaining kefir grains, then the whole process is simply repeated for the next batch. Your kefir grains will grow and multiply each week, so increase the milk or remove some of the grains. You can give your extra grains to friends or pets, or you can even blend them up in the blender with a smoothie and drink them. They are good for you!
  5. The kefir that went through the strainer (that came in the jar) can be placed in a glass jar to be consumed, immediately. It can also be stored in the fridge. This will last many months in your refrigerator and is preserved by the presence of good bacteria, which keeps the milk safe. However, it will get more sour over time as it will slowly keep fermenting in your fridge. Every 24 hours when your kefir is done, you can add to the batch of the previously made kefir in your fridge or drink it.
    The kefir that went through the strainer (that came in the jar) can be placed in a glass jar to be consumed, immediately. It can also be stored in the fridge. This will last many months in your refrigerator and is preserved by the presence of good bacteria, which keeps the milk safe. However, it will get more sour over time as it will slowly keep fermenting in your fridge. Every 24 hours when your kefir is done, you can add to the batch of the previously made kefir in your fridge or drink it.
Taking a Break from Kefir
  1. If you have to go on vacation, here is an article to help you. What to Do With Your Cultures While You’re on Vacation.
    If you have to go on vacation, here is an article to help you. What to Do With Your Cultures While You’re on Vacation.
Kefir Changes
  1. Your kefir can ferment and be thin and pourable or thick like yogurt. The temperature in your house determines how quickly it ferments. In the summer it ferments faster and tends to be thinner. In the winter it ferments more slowly and is usually thicker and creamier
    Your kefir can ferment and be thin and pourable or thick like yogurt. The temperature in your house determines how quickly it ferments. In the summer it ferments faster and tends to be thinner. In the winter it ferments more slowly and is usually thicker and creamier
Kefir Seperating
  1. If your kefir separates into whey and curds, don’t worry. It’s just a little over fermented and is still good to drink. You'll need to add more milk or shorten the fermenting time or remove some of the grains. Check out this article for more help. Thick and Thin of Kefir
    If your kefir separates into whey and curds, don’t worry. It’s just a little over fermented and is still good to drink. You'll need to add more milk or shorten the fermenting time or remove some of the grains. Check out this article for more help. Thick and Thin of Kefir
Creamy Kefir
  1. If your kefir separates into whey and curds, check out this post for tips on how to make it creamy again. How to make your kefir creamy again
    If your kefir separates into whey and curds, check out this post for tips on how to make it creamy again. How to make your kefir creamy again
  2. If you have more questions, check out our FAQ's about kefir page.
    If you have more questions, check out our FAQ's about kefir page.
Recipe Notes

(*1) Most milk types are acceptable, including whole milk, fat-reduced, non-fat, pasteurized, and homogenized, although I mostly enjoy fresh raw whole cow’s milk to culture kefir.

CulturedFoodLife.com
10 Responses to "Kefir Using Live Kefir Grains"
  1. Good morning!
    I ordered some Kefir grains from you yesterday, and am excited to make my own Kefir! I’d like to use organic milk, but don’t know if it is ultra pasteurized, as you discussed on your web site. Not sure if I can find milk without hormones and antibiotics in the area of Florida where I live. What do you suggest? Thanks for your input. Gabriele

  2. I am determined to improve my health and the health of my family.
    I plan on taking your advice,to begin with just one project at a time.
    But can’t decide which to start with.Kefir or Kombucha…help please…

  3. In your Kefir breakfast pudding video, you said you use second fermented kefir. What is that, how do you make it, would it be very sour?
    Thanks,
    Denise

  4. I have purchased kefir from the grocery store but would like to make it at home. We presently purchase raw goat milk in Kansas City and would like to make kefir from the goat milk. We switched to goat milk a number of years ago because we have been told by numerous sources that it is better for humans than cow milk. You articles on kefir reference the kefir grains needing lactose to survive, but I thought goat milk did not have lactose like cow milk. Can you clarify? Can we make goat milk kefir?

    • Yes, you can make kefir in goats milk and it will do great with the other milk sugars but it doesn’t get thick like cows milk but rather creamy but still it delicious and good for you.

  5. I def will be making this very soon. I keep reading that people make kefir water. how do you make water kefir (esp flavored options) and where do you get the grains? Thanks

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