If you like this, then please share!

Cashew Kefir

by

Cashew_apples copy

The tallest tree in the forest was once just a little nut that held its ground.

This is a cashew apple tree. Cashew nuts are actually the kidney-shaped seeds that adhere to the bottom of the cashew apple grown mostly in Brazil. Interesting, isn’t it? Cashews are all the rage these days and used in all kinds of health food dishes – and for good reason. They’re delicious and good for you.

Cashews are ripe with proanthocyanidins, a class of flavanols that actually starves tumors and stops cancer cells from dividing. They’re also abundant in essential minerals, especially manganese, potassium, copper, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium. Plus, they taste delicious and they’re my husband’s favorite nut (besides me!). So I decided to make kefir with them.

cashew milkMy husband’s aunt, Carolyn, sent me a message. She found an easy way to make almond kefir and wanted to share it with me. It turned out wonderfully, so I decided to try it with cashews and the result was a deliciously creamy cashew kefir. It’s a different method and quite easy, no straining of the nuts in a nut bag, and I think you will love it. If you can’t have dairy, I think cashew kefir is a great alternative with tons of probiotics.

 

Cashew Kefir
When making non dairy kefir, you just need to be sure the non dairy milk has eight grams of carbohydrates to give the bacteria something to eat. It takes the sugars and makes it into probiotics for you. You don’t get the sugar but instead lots of healthy probiotics. If it doesn’t have eight grams of carbohydrates than you can add one teaspoon of date paste, or raw sugar, per quart. I have placed the recommended amounts for cashew milk in the recipe below. ~Donna
Print Recipe
Add to Meal Plan
(Members only)
This recipe has been added to your Meal Plan
Ingredients
Cashew milk
  • 1cup whole raw cashewsunsalted or salted can be used
  • 4cups Water
Cashew Kefir (if using Live Milk Kefir Grains)
Cashew Kefir (if using Easy Kefir powder packets)
Servings: quart
Units:
Instructions
Cashew Milk
  1. Place cashews and water in a blender. Blend on high speed until cashews are incorporated and blended into a smooth consistency.
  2. If you want a thinner consistency, strain this mixture through a nut bag to remove the small pieces. For a thicker consistency, leave the pulp in. (It might stick to the kefir grains but it doesn't hurt them.)
  3. Use immediately to make cashew kefir or store in the fridge for a week.
Cashew Kefir (if using Live Milk Kefir Grains)
  1. Place 1 quart of cashew milk into a glass jar and add 1 teaspoon of date paste or some type of raw sugar. (see note below)
  2. Add 2-3 tablespoon of kefir grains to cashew milk and date paste or raw sugar.
  3. Place a lid on the jar and let it sit for 8 to 16 hours or until tart or sour tasting.
  4. Strain out kefir grains.
  5. Place cashew kefir in the refrigerator.
  6. Place your kefir grains in fresh milk and date paste or sugar to culture again and keep them alive.
Cashew Kefir (if using Easy Kefir powder packets)
  1. Add 1 quart of cashew milk to a glass jar.
  2. Add 1 teaspoon of date paste or some type of raw sugar (see note below) to the jar.
  3. Mix in 1 packet Easy Kefir with a spoon or whisk or until all ingredients are thoroughly combined.
  4. Place a lid on the jar and let it sit for 8 to 16 hours or until tart or sour tasting.
  5. Place cashew kefir in the refrigerator or enjoy immediately. It should keep for at least a month although it will continue to get more sour and tart.
  6. If you like to make more kefir, take 1/4 cup of this mixture and 3 - 3/4 cups of fresh cashew milk and culture again for 18 -24 hours or until tart. You can do this many many times over or until it stops working and making the milk tart. Then you will need a new Easy Kefir package.
  7. It should keep for at least a month although it will continue to get more sour and tart.
Recipe Notes

Check out this recipe for making Date paste.
If the kefir still tastes sweet after 24 hours add less date paste so it will ferment faster.

CulturedFoodLife.com

 

 

 

37 Responses to "Cashew Kefir"
  1. I want to like kefir, but I hate it! Tastes like sour milk. It’s okay to cook with, but I’d like to be able to use it more often. Do you do anything to it in order to drink it?

  2. Hi, I’m very new to all this–
    After straining the Kefir grains,
    can I reuse them in another batch?

  3. I too am needing the specifics of how to make the thinned down “date paste” due to health issues that require low/no sugar and dairy. Can someone please offer a “recipe”?

    Thanks! Great info! 🙂

    • Date paste Soak your dates overnight in filtered water. Drain keeping water. Puree in blender or food processor until a smooth paste has been achieved adding small amounts of date water if needed. Once you received the desired consistency of your date paste use the left over date water in a smoothie.

  4. The Live Kefir Grains, are they from a cow? I am interested in make kefir vegan style. thanks so much, gael.

  5. This is great info! I’m new to making kefir. I have some Silk sweetened almond milk that nobody will drink (I usually do unsweetened, but my mom bought the wrong one). Can I use that to make kefir, so I don’t have to throw away the almond milk?

      • That is really good to know, my son can’t a lot of cow milk and even after making kefir with it my son still got a bad rash from it, so we’ve used the water kefir. That basically died when we moved but I’m glad to know we can use the almond milk, that’s what he uses anyway. Usually the unsweetened, but I will get some sweetened and try it again!

  6. I tried the recipe for cashew kefir and let it sit for 12+ hours as instructed but it never got thick but was still liquid. I have tried to make almond kefir in the past and the same thing happened, it never got thick. Is there something I am missing? Thank you!

  7. Hi Donna,

    Wondering if you ever consider soaking your nuts In water for a period of time to get the enzyme inhibitors out? I know that something that Sally Fallon talks about in her book nourishing traditions. And it’s something I’ve read in a number of other places as well

    I’m guessing there’s a good chance that probiotics could possibly eat all that stuff up and it is a non-issue…

  8. Is the recipe for your Cashew kefir the same as your Aunt’s recipe for Almond Kefir? I like to have the variety in my diet…If not can you please add that to your recipes for us? Thanks

  9. Would you mind sharing the recipe your husband’s aunt sent using almond milk for making kefir? Thank you, Donna!

  10. OH yes, narf77, I’d love to know how you make your sesame milk and the date puree… how much of the grains do you use in how much milk? Being a strict vegan I’d longed to make an alternate milk kefir, but figured it would be impossible to keep the grains producing! You are a ray of sunshine & hope that maybe we can keep the grains growing “veganically” ~Smile… Many thanks!

    • It doesn’t work very well with these starters and I believe its because it doesn’t have as many good bacteria as the kefir grains do. It will make one or two servings but doesn’t seem to continue after that and you need another package and it takes much longer to culture as well.

  11. And can you tell how you make your sesame milk? blend only? or strain through nut milk bag? water proportion. Thx!

    • It doesn’t work very well with these starters and I believe its because it doesn’t have as many good bacteria as the kefir grains do. It will make one or two servings but doesn’t seem to continue after that and you need another package and it takes much longer to culture as well.

  12. i have been following and enjoying your postings. I have a question about the Kefir used for the cashew recipe. I am not taking any dairy in my diet is there and alternative way to ferment the cashew or should I not worry about it?

  13. I am vegan and I used to make my own kefir with non-dairy homemade sesame milk that I added homemade date puree (thinned down) to in order to feed the grains. I started out by dunking my grains into cows milk once a fortnight to keep them alive but then one day I had enough grains and I decided that I was going to test how long the grains would live if I only used them in my sesame milk. a year and a half later they were still happily culturing my “milk”. I am guessing that my grains converted to the date sugar quite happily as they showed no signs of either dying or slowing down. If you have vegan readers, they might like to experiment a bit rather than relying on having to dunk their grains in milk. I dare say the probiotics in my kefir were different to those in regular milk but the end result was tart, delicious and probiotic rich.

If you like this, then please share!
QR Code Business Card