Frequently Asked Questions About Sprouted Grains

1
Can I use sprouted flour to make sourdough bread?

No, you shouldn’t use sprouted flour when making sourdough bread. The bacteria in the sourdough starter wants to break down the enzyme inhibitors in the flour. This has already been accomplished when you make sprouted flour. So if you were to use sprouted flour when making sourdough bread, there’s nothing for the bacteria to break down. Your bread might not rise or work properly.

2
How long should I let my grains sprout?

The optimal amount of time to sprout your grains is 36 hours. You will see very tiny white stubs coming out of the end of the grains. Long sprouts on the grains are not desirable. A tiny sprout is best. When you sprout it longer, it alters the grain, reducing its beneficial properties.

3
How long does sprouted flour keep after milling?

Sprouted flour can be stored at room temperature for six months after milling unlike unsprouted flour that must be used immediately so it doesn’t go rancid. The germ cell of the grain is the part that degrades and becomes rancid when milled. When grains are sprouted, the germ cell is consumed by the endosperm and it is no longer in a state that can become rancid. This is one of the many advantages of sprouted flour.

4

Can I use sprouted flour as a substitute for regular flour?

Yes, you can substitute sprouted flour for conventional flour one-to-one in most recipes. I do this all the time, and it works great. However, you shouldn’t use sprouted flour when making sourdough bread. The bacteria in the sourdough starter wants to break down the enzyme inhibitors in the flour. This has already been accomplished when you make sprouted flour. So if you were to use sprouted flour when making sourdough bread, there’s nothing for the bacteria to break down. Your bread might not rise or work properly.