How to Make Cultured Vegetables

  1. PageLines-CampTrilogyCulturedVegetablesthumb.jpgYou first must choose the vessel you will want to use to ferment the vegetables. You can use a canning jar with a lid, a crock with a lid, a clamp down jar that has a gasket, or my favorite is a jar with an airlock lid. Airlock jars creating a low-oxygen, or, anaerobic environment, in which lactic-acid bacteria may thrive. It creates the best results with less chance of mold, but this is not absolutely necessary.
  2. You will then choose to use a culture to ferment or to ferment without one. You can certainly make them without a culture but the good bacteria will stay at a higher level longer if you add a culture. This will also increase your own body’s ability to use and grow these good bacteria inside of you. The one that I believe does this the best is Cutting Edge Cultures. The three fermenting methods are listed below.

    Using No Culture

    You can make culture vegetables by simply chopping or placing vegetables in vessels, then submerging them under water making sure the vegetables are covered with water. You must add salt with this method because the vegetables with the acidifying bacteria create the probiotics that preserve your vegetables. Salt is important because without a starter culture it helps ferment the vegetables and create the right environment for fermentation to take place. This creates and environment that is safe. The good bacteria dominate and keep out harmful pathogens. You must leave two-inches of room at the top of the container for expansion inside the jar; otherwise the vegetables will expand and can over flow. Allow this to ferment on your counter for six to seven days. Then place the jar of vegetables in the fridge where they will last for at least 9 months.

    Using Kefir whey

    whey2If using the whey from kefir make sure that it is fresh for the best results. Click here to learn how to make kefir whey. The amounts of whey you use will vary according to how big your jars are. Chop and place vegetables in vessels, then submerge them under water and make sure the vegetables are covered with water. Then you will add your kefir whey. You must leave a two-inch room for expansion inside the jar. These will expand and can over flow. Follow directions on each recipe as to how long to leave them fermenting on your counter. Then place the jar of vegetables in the fridge where they will last for at least 9 month.

    Using a Starter Culture

    cutting edge cultures 4This is my favorite method for making culture vegetables. Cutting Edge Cultures is my favorite starter culture. It’s stronger than anything else I’ve used. Cutting Edge Starter Culture is a synergistic blend of carefully selected bacteria strains. One of the key criteria used to evaluate this blend was how quickly and by how much the acidity increased after fermentation began. The faster you can drop the pH in your homemade fermented vegetables, the healthier and safer they will be. Cutting Edge Cultures does this better than any other product on the market, which gives you more probiotics in your culture and allows them to stay stronger for longer due to the extra strong good bacteria this culture provides.

    Click here to purchase

Video:  How to Make Cultured Vegetables.


Three Recipe Cards below for:

Making Cultured Vegetables Using a Starter Culture

Making Cultured Vegetables without a Culture

Making Cultured Vegetables Using Kefir Whey


Cultured Vegetables using a Starter Culture
Check out more about super charging your vegetables with Cutting Edge Culture.~Donna
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Ingredients
  • 1/4teaspoon Cutting Edge Cultures
  • 1cup Waterto mix starter with
  • 1head cabbage
  • 1 appleunpeeled and cored
  • 1medium oranges
  • 1Tablespoon Celtic Sea Salt
  • filtered wateryou can use spring water as well
Servings: gallon
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Instructions
  1. If using the starter culture, stir together the culture and water. Let the mixture sit while you prepare the ingredients—around 10 minutes. If using kefir whey, add it when the recipe calls for culture.
  2. Remove outer leaves of cabbage. Finely shred cabbage and apple. You can use a food processor or a hand shredder. Place in a large bowl.
  3. Add salt to cabbage and apples. Toss to combine.
  4. Slice orange in thin pieces and place around the outside of the jar or you can just layer them in the jar anywhere.
  5. Pack cabbage and apples into the jar.
  6. Cover with water. Leave 2 to 3 inches in the jar for the kraut to expand. Place a lid on the jar and set in a cool place, out of sunlight for 6 days.
  7. Check the vegetables every day to make sure they are fully submerged in the water. If they have risen above the water, simply push them down so they are fully covered by the water. If any white spots formed because the veggies rose above the water, do not worry. Remember, this isn’t harmful. Just scoop out the vegetables that have the white spots on them and push the rest back under the water.
CulturedFoodLife.com

Cultured Vegetables without a Culture
This is delicious with just cabbage but you can add other ingredients such as spinach, carrots, seasonings, etc. You must use salt if you don't use a starter culture. It is necessary to keep the PH correct and keep the bacteria at a safe level. ~Donna
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Ingredients
Servings: gallon
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Instructions
  1. Remove outer leaves of cabbage.
  2. Shred cabbage into desired length.
  3. You can use a food processor or by hand.
  4. Add salt and toss with cabbage to combine evenly.
  5. Pack cabbage into a gallon jug with a clamp down lid or an airlock or canning jar.
  6. Cover with water.
  7. Leave 2 to 3 inches for kraut to expand.
  8. Set in a cool place, out of sunlight for 6 to 7 days.
  9. Check the vegetables every day to make sure they are fully submerged in the water. If they have risen above the water, simply push them down so they are fully covered by the water. If any white spots formed because the veggies rose above the water, do not worry. Remember, this isn’t harmful. Just scoop out the vegetables that have the white spots on them and push the rest back under the water.
  10. After 6 days place in the refrigerator.
  11. They will last at least 9 months or longer in your fridge.
CulturedFoodLife.com

Cultured Vegetables using Kefir Whey
These can get a different taste than veggies made with a starter culture depending on the taste of your kefir whey. Always use fresh kefir whey when making cultured vegetables for the best taste.~Donna
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Ingredients
Servings: Gallon
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Instructions
  1. Shred or chop, cabbage, carrots, parsley, apple and spinach and place in a large bowl.
  2. Add salt and toss to combine.
  3. Pack vegetables into 1/2 gallon jar leaving two inches for kraut to expand and ferment.
  4. Add kefir whey and fill with water leaving two inches for kraut to expand and ferment.
  5. Set in a cool place, out of sunlight for 6 to 7 days then place in refrigerator.
  6. Check the vegetables every day to make sure they are fully submerged in the water. If they have risen above the water, simply push them down so they are fully covered by the water. If any white spots formed because the veggies rose above the water, do not worry. Remember, this isn’t harmful. Just scoop out the vegetables that have the white spots on them and push the rest back under the water.
  7. They will last at least 9 months or longer in your fridge.
CulturedFoodLife.com

 For more cultured vegetable recipes click here

5 Responses to "How to Make Cultured Vegetables"
  1. Can you use the liquid in the jars as a culture again for the next batch of veggies, or do you have to keep adding new water/starter culture?

    • You can reuse the liquid several times! The fresher the brine is, the more times you can reuse it.

  2. Elizabeth,
    When something ferments it can build pressure in the container! This is likely what happened – did you have the jar closed tight or slightly loose to allow air flow? Do you have an airlock lid?
    To see if you can use it, I would smell it and go from there, you can probably tell from the smell and taste if it is good or bad, though it may need to ferment a bit more to be sure. Then again, it might be fermented enough, there are many variables, time, temp, veggie ripeness and whey strength, etc.
    Hope this Helps :-}

  3. Hi I made cultured jar of cabbage, carrots and grapes. I added water and the kefir whey and that night the lid of the jar popped open!! Is this still ok to use? I covered it in the morning and not sure what to do now? Please let me know? Thank you. I have enoyed the kefir and find it extremely helpful for me.

    Regards
    Elizabeth