tomatoes

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

This is a favorite summertime salad made with cucumbers, tomatoes, and red onions that are abundant in the summertime. The taste is so light and fresh that I can eat gallons of this salad. I have had this salad many, many times made with vinegar but it was never fermented. So I took it upon myself to fermentize it and fill it with probiotics.  My brother-in-law has coined this word – fermentize – and he made me laugh when he asked if I can fermentize every known food under the sun. Here are a bunch of reasons to make this salad and not the least of them is that it’s cultured, or fermentized, and loaded with enzymes and probiotics to make these special vegetables even more powerful.


tomatoesHere are just a few of the things tomatoes can do for you:


cucumbersThese are just a few compound helpers in cucumbers:


red onionsRed onions have powerful properties:

  • Allicin in onions fights regenerative diseases and fungi.
  • Anthocyanins: A type of phytochemical which is anti-inflammatory and strengthens eyesight and the nervous system. Anthocyanins have also been linked to improving memory and the prevention of aging.
  • Red onions are high in vitamin C that protects cells from oxidative damage, supports collagen formation in wound healing, and promotes a healthy immune system.
  • Onion is full of flavonoids, particularly quercetin. Flavonoids are natural chemicals that prevent the deposit of fatty material in blood vessels. Quercetin is a powerful antioxidant that is believed to help reduce heart disease and protect against many forms of cancer. It also has anti-inflammatory properties.

So now do you think you should make this super easy salad? I think you had better. Your body will thank you!

Fermented-Cucumber-Tomato-Salad
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Fermented-Cucumber-Tomato-Salad
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CulturedFoodLife.com
CulturedFoodLife.com Print Recipe
Servings: 1quart
Servings: 1quart
You can add more fresh tomatoes that are not fermented to stretch the dish to feed more people. Super yummy, so the more tomatoes the merrier!
~Donna
Ingredients
  • 1/4of a package Caldwell’s Starter Cultureor 1/4 cup of kefir whey
  • 3 medium tomatoeshalved lengthwise, seeded, and thinly sliced
  • 1/4 red onionpeeled, halved lengthwise, and thinly sliced
  • 1 Cucumberhalved lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 2teaspoons Celtic sea salt
  • 1/4teaspoon coarse ground pepper
  • 1/4cup parsleyfresh, finely chopped
  • olive oil
Servings: quart
Units:
Instructions
  1. If using the starter culture, place 1 cup of lukewarm water in a glass measuring cup.Then add the culture and stir until dissolved.
    If using the starter culture, place 1 cup of lukewarm water in a glass measuring cup.Then add the culture and stir until dissolved.
  2. Let the mixture sit while you chop your tomatoes—anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes. If using kefir whey, add it when the recipe calls for culture in step 5.
    Let the mixture sit while you chop your tomatoes—anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes. If using kefir whey, add it when the recipe calls for culture in step 5.
  3. Place the tomatoes, onion, cucumbers, salt, and pepper in a large bowl and toss to combine.
    Place the tomatoes, onion, cucumbers, salt, and pepper in a large bowl and toss to combine.
  4. Add the mixture to a 1 quart glass jar that can be securely sealed.
    Add the mixture to a 1 quart glass jar that can be securely sealed.
  5. Add the culture or kefir whey and fill the container with filtered water, leaving 2 inches of headspace, as the vegetables will bubble and expand as they ferment.
    Add the culture or kefir whey and fill the container with filtered water, leaving 2 inches of headspace, as the vegetables will bubble and expand as they ferment.
  6. Seal the container and let it sit on your kitchen counter, out of direct sunlight, for 2 days.
    Seal the container and let it sit on your kitchen counter, out of direct sunlight, for 2 days.
  7. Check the vegetables every day to make sure they are fully submerged in the water. If they have risen above the water, simply push them down so they are fully covered by the water. If any mold forms because the veggies rose above the water, do not worry. Remember, this isn’t harmful. Just scoop out the moldy vegetables and push the rest back under the water.
    Check the vegetables every day to make sure they are fully submerged in the water. If they have risen above the water, simply push them down so they are fully covered by the water. If any mold forms because the veggies rose above the water, do not worry. Remember, this isn’t harmful. Just scoop out the moldy vegetables and push the rest back under the water.
  8. After it has fermented, scoop out the vegetables with a slotted spoon to drain off the water and keep the brine in the jar. Place the vegetables in a bowl.
    After it has fermented, scoop out the vegetables with a slotted spoon to drain off the water and keep the brine in the jar. Place the vegetables in a bowl.
  9. Toss with parsley and drizzle with olive oil. Add optional ingredients if desired. Serve immediately.
    Toss with parsley and drizzle with olive oil. Add optional ingredients if desired. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

You can keep the brine in the jar, add more vegetables to it, and ferment again.

CulturedFoodLife.com